Monthly Archives: June 2011

Pebble Grain

Posted on by Jeff

Pebble grain leather, along with its cousins pin grain, alpine grain, and scotch grain, is not a naturally occuring texture.  It’s a pattern embossed on the leather in the tanning … Continue reading

Uncomplicated Is OK

Posted on by Jeff

As Will Boehlke has often pointed out, the best way to coordinate shirts, ties, pocket squares, and suits or jackets is to choose items that complement one another but don’t … Continue reading

Repp Stripes

Posted on by Jeff

The iconic necktie pattern in classic American clothing – what some refer to as “Trad,” as in traditional – is the repp stripe.  Repp refers to the ribs that are … Continue reading

Gingham

Posted on by Jeff

  The rule for coordinating a shirt with a relatively bold pattern is the same as what we mentioned regarding the boldly patterned suit: keep everything else fairly simple. Suit: … Continue reading

Know Your Colors

Posted on by Jeff

  One key to dressing well is to know how your complexion works with clothes of different colors and combinations of different contrast levels.  This is the philosophy behind Color … Continue reading

Madras

Posted on by Jeff

  Madras, the brightly colored plaid cotton fabric that originally came from India, is a traditional American staple for warm-weather clothing.  The colors and patterns make it an inherently casual … Continue reading

Sometimes Used Is Better

Posted on by Jeff

  For any given price point, you could conceivably be faced with a range of options when buying clothes.  For example, if you have $20 to spend on a shirt, … Continue reading

Don’t Go Monochrome

Posted on by Jeff

  Several years ago, an unpleasant trend toward monochrome looks became popular, driven largely by Regis Philbin’s low-contrast, metallic-toned wardrobe on Who Wants To Be A Millionaire. A better approach … Continue reading

The Boldly Patterned Suit

Posted on by Jeff

  In this era when most men seldom wear suits, there is a distinct fear of bold patterns in suiting fabrics.  After all, bold patterns are normally not appropriate for … Continue reading

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